New sub need training

Added: Eddie Vivier - Date: 08.02.2022 13:02 - Views: 48175 - Clicks: 964

This paper presents discussion on impact of training traditional birth attendants TBAs on overall improvement of reproductive health care with focus on reducing the high rate of maternal and new-born mortality in rural settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of TBAs for years has been denied by professional western trained health practitioners and other scientists until during the late s, when World Health Organization through Safe motherhood found TBAs have a ificant role in reducing maternal and new-born mortality. Trained TBAs in sub-Sahara Africa can have positive impact on reducing maternal and new-born mortality if the programme is well implemented with systematic follow-up after training.

This could be done through t meeting between health workers and TBAs as feed and learning experience from problem encountered in process of providing child delivery services. TBAs can help to break socio-cultural barriers on intervention on reproductive health programmes. However projects targeting TBAs should not be of hit and run; but gradually familiarize with the target group, build trust, transparency, and tolerance, willing to learn and creating rappour with them.

In this paper, some case studies are described on how trained TBAs can be fully utilized in reducing maternal and new-born mortality rate in rural areas. What is needed is to identify TBAs, map their distribution and train them on basic primary healthcare related to child deliveries and complications which need to be referred to conventional health facilities immediately. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. Search: Search. Advanced Clipboard. Display options Display options.

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Kwast BE. PMID: Review. Ampofo DA, et al. Trop Geogr Med. PMID: Maternal mortality and morbidity. Zimbabwe's birth force. Jacobson JL. Maternal mortality in Ghana: is there a place for traditional birth attendants TBAs as reporters of maternal mortality-related data?

Adadevoh SW. Trop J Obstet Gynaecol. Traditional birth attendant training for improving health behaviours and pregnancy outcomes. Sibley LM, et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. See all similar articles. Cited by 7 articles Traditional birth attendants' experiences during the provision of post-natal care in Mopani District, Limpopo province of South Africa. Ngunyulu RN, et al.

Health SA. Improving maternal and newborn care: cost-effectiveness of an innovation to rebrand traditional birth attendants in Sierra Leone. Fotso JC, et al. Int J Public Health. Epub Oct Muzyamba C, et al. Community perceptions towards the new role of traditional birth attendants as birth companions and nutrition advocates in Kakamega County, Kenya.

Anono EL, et al. Matern Child Nutr. Hernandez S, et al. Front Public Health. See all "Cited by" articles. MeSH terms Adult Actions. Female Actions. Humans Actions. Infant Actions. Infant, Newborn Actions. Pregnancy Actions. Quality Improvement Actions. Rural Population Actions. Related information MedGen. Copy Download.

New sub need training

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